Home cooks try to use a cookbook from 1914!!
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– [Announcer] We are Sorted, a group of mates from London exploring the newest and
best in the world of food whilst trying to have a
few laughs along the way. (laughs) We got chefs, we’ve got normals (bleep) and a whole world of
stuff for you to explore. But everything we do starts with you. (rhythmic rock music) – Hello, he’s Ben, I’m Jamie, this is fridge cam. – And a few months back James and I were challenged to cook out of a cookbook from 1914. – And you guys said in your hundreds that you wanted two
normals to give it a go. (Ben laughs) – Why are you smiling like that? – And why are we without a chef? – I’m in a video and I’m not cooking. (laughs) – Lift the cloche. – After you, yeah go for it. – Oh no!
– Oh for flip! – They’ve done this video, you need to do this video. – Is this a recipe book or a dictionary? – It is a reference book for chefs from the 1900s. – So this recipe is from this section. The section is “Suprêmes de Volaille.” – “De Volaille.” – And the recipe is
(groans) Chicken Hongroise. – So “Suprêmes de Volaille,” chicken filets.
– chicken filets! – Right fine. – “Season it with paprika, “cook in butter, “swirl with cream “and Hongroise…” – Sauce, oh no. Is there a sauce section? – Page 17. – Hongroise sauce. “Chopped onions, partly
fried in butter with paprika. “Moistened with white wine, “reduced and mixed with suprême sauce.” – Right, better get our suprême sauce now? (Mark and James laugh) This is silly! So we do have to start with suprême and work our way back. – Suprême? – Oh reduced velouté!
– It’s a reduced velouté! (Mark laughs) Which we have to cohere with cream. – Should we get you set up to go? – Yeah, okay. – So excited. – Boys. You have an hour and a
half to create the dish. – I’ll time it, don’t worry. I’ll time it. – Three, two, one, cook. (buzzing sound) – [Jamie] So it’s chicken and rice? – In my head it’s quite like biryani. It could be. – Have you read the recipe? – How have you got biryani from that? – I can make it look like
a really cool biryani. – You focus on the
chicken part of the dish, I’ll focus on the sauce part of the dish. – Okay. – So we’ve set the guys a challenge and they’re timing it. We’re gonna eat what they
produce at the very end and then James is gonna pick one of them to be head chef and the
other to be sous chef. So basically place them
in first and second place. – Slices. – Yes, slices across.
– Like goujons? – You’re cutting a suprême. Nice long strokes. Oh no. (laughs) – [Mark] James! – So what is is? – Well I was taught in Uni
is a suprême the breast but you have the bone of
the wing coming off that. And then you clean the bone very nicely, and it just looks really beautiful. – I’m going to melt some butter. I’m going to stir in some flour, I’m gonna let that cook out for a while so it turns into a roux. Then I’m going to add
in some chicken stock to turn it into a velouté. (grunts) – Okay on this one, I’ve kept the wing on so you get a bit of bone. So may plan here is to slice up some onion and get them cooking on a low heat. – Right, what’re you chopping onion for? – [James] No Barry. No. Not in a French kitchen. There you go. (laughter) Remember we haven’t weighed anything so we might not need three onions. – Mate! Flavor! – Yeah, I’m going to need onions as well. For my “Honduras” sauce. – I’m making that! – Why are you making that? You’re concentrating on
everything the chicken needs. – The chicken’s done! The chicken just needs cooking. SO I’m going to cook ’em in
butter with a bit of paprika, get ’em soft. And then mix it with your suprême sauce. – Is French cuisine about
just throwing things in and just being very kind
of like, “Meh and Meh!” about it, or is it about precision? – Those onions are
perfectly diced, so shush. – Barry’s diced these onions. (Jamie laughs) Did you put the onion peel in it?! What’s the skin doing in there? – Fine! Fine! – They haven’t even got to the rice yet. – They haven’t even
mentioned the rice yet. – Now why don’t you cook some chicken seasoned with paprika? – You’re just giving me a job
that you don’t want to do. That’s all you’re doing. – That is not true!
– I know your game! – When’s the rice go in mate? – It’s pilaf rice, isn’t it? – What’s a pilaf rice? – It’s cooked in stock. Not cooked in water. – Cook it in the oven,
it takes a lot longer than normal rice. So it’ll be about half an hour. – [Mark] How long you think the rice is going to take? – Twelve minutes. – You still gotta finish
off your suprême, mate. – There’s no more to
do with that like that? That’s it, isn’t it? I know you can’t give us tips but… – Can’t touch it, I can’t touch it. No I’m not allowed to touch it. Definitely not allowed to touch. – You’re doing too much by telling him. – I know. Yeah. – [Mike] James, that’s
pretty much touching. (laughter) – I thought we’d been quite
generous with the time. I’m worried. – I’ve now got my
velouté and it’s reduced. So I’m now going to
cohere it with some cream to turn it into a suprême sauce. That is delicious mate. That is supreme. – Right, I’m now about
to fry off my chicken “supreme” breast. I’m excited right now,
this is looking great. We’ll turn those, cook the other side, then put some cream in. – It feels to me like cream
is more of a finishing aspect, than a cooking aspect. – We’ve got very defined roles here. There’s a clear head chef
commis chef going on. – Spaf has absolutely nailed it. – What’s that for? – Is that more cream? That is milk. – That’s milk. Okay. – Have we missed something? – Did I put milk there? Ignore the milk!
(laughter) Sorry! – [Jamie] I think about some rice? – You can think about it when we do with the tomatoes. – Tomatoes go in the rice, I think. – [James] How’re you going
to cook the tomatoes? – [Jamie] Not gonna cook the tomatoes. – It doesn’t specify it. But what I would do is
blanch them for a minute then peel them
(Jamie and Barry shouting) and then take the seeds out. So it’s got no skin. Classical French cooking didn’t really like the skin of tomatoes. – Should I blanch ’em? That’s a French term. – Oh that is a French term. – I’ll blanch them.
– Blanch them. – It’s blanching them.
– Blanch them. – Why would you blanch? – To get rid of the skin. – Barry is back in the game. – Should I put it in the oven, then? – Yes. – I’m gonna turn my suprême sauce into a Hongroise sauce by putting my onions that’ve been partly fried in butter
and reduced in white wine into my suprême sauce. – Another observation
about head chefs Spaf. – Don’t put it all in, he put them all in. He put it all in. He didn’t think. That’s the first time
I’ve seen him not think. ‘Cause it’s gonna be mostly onion and not a lot of velouté now. So its not going to be a sauce anymore. It’s going to be really nasty. – [Jamie] Oh, yes boys. – What time did you put the chicken in? (bleep) – When did you– – I’ll time, check time. Cool. Five minutes ago.. – What, roughly? – Yeah. – [Mark] Now if I’m blanching tomatoes, what would I do to make
them easier to peel when they come out? – [James] Just put little
a little cross in the top of each one.
– Aw, you (bleep). – So it just starts peeling away. – Hate you so much! – You are pushing for that head chef spot. – Je m’appelle “Le Boss”. – Baz, I’ve found a recipe for pilaf rice and we’re gonna follow it. – That’s useful. – Guys you have 35 minutes. – [Barry] What’s wrong? – No no, I’m good mate. I’m just checking that this pilaf rice is the same as the pilaf rice that we want to be making. – There was a point about ten
minutes ago where they said, “This is how you cook pilaf rice,” then described how you cook pilaf rice. And they still haven’t done it. – It’s cooked in stock. Not cooked in water. – [James] He’s lost his alpha. But Barry hasn’t gained it, that’s the problem. – [Mike] I know.
(laughter) – Barry, right! What we need to do is stop this rice from boiling in that water. (laughter) – How is the time, Jamie, on
the recipe you’re reading? – 20 to 25 minutes. – Well I’m getting nervous. – I’m nervous. – I think our chicken is done. I just realized, I’m letting that chicken rest. Should I have put cream in it?
– The cream in it. I man, you’re completely
in charge of the chicken. – “Swirl in the cream.” Don’t really know. Putting that cream in there.
– Right, more pilaf rice. – Flavor. – Oh no! It’s bad. It’s bad. – [Mark] Whoa, are you going full pilaf? – [Jamie] Oh, now he knows what I’m doing. Saute some onions. Job done. What are you doing? – I’m canoeing. – He put rice with raw onion. – I like how he went, “Oh no.”
(laughter) and you turned to me and went, “What am I doing?” not thinking you’re the one to blame. – Gonna pour my stock into here. – Did you weigh that? – Sure. – “Pass-it-on” Jamie has
just appeared from nowhere. (laughter) – What is happened in that frying pan? – I don’t know mate. – 20 minutes to go, mate. I’m worried about the rice, if I’m honest. You need to make a decision on plating. – Oh okay, he’s back on me. – No, to be fair, whilst you’re doing that you’ve already got your hands dirty. I’ll get a plate. – Alpha Spaf is back. – Can you try and find the green plate with the red rim? Doesn’t exist. – Is it this one? – A classic French, a bed of rice, maybe in a little ring, suprême on top, and then the sauce just all the way around. Then you put a little
bit of paprika around it. – Plate? Big white plate? – I’d do the same plate
as I did for this dish. I’d probably just stick
with that for every dish. – [Barry] A tea would be better. A black plate would be lovely.
– A black plate? – A flat black plate with a nice rim. – Oh yeah, that’s the one. – Okay.
– Black plate. – Perfect, thank you. – Flat, with a little rim. – Lovely, good job. – [James] Breakdown. Brilliant. – [Mark] Oh, he’s having a breakdown. – We would choose a black plate because it contrasts with the color of the rice. In France, classily, they probably wouldn’t have different colors of plates. Why don’t you sneak away
(laughter) and find yourself a clean, white plate. Or like, a bowl. – Oh let me get a ramekin. _ No we’re not doing a ramekin! – [Barry] I’m getting a ramekin. No!
(laughter) – Yes. – [Barry] Rice goes into that. (ramekin clatters) – We’re not doing a ramekin of rice. – Why not?
– Because read the recipe. “Dress on pilaf rice.” If you do a ramekin of rice, what’re you gonna do, rest your bit of chicken right on top of the tower of rice? – Yeah. – Oh that sounds quite good, actually. Well when you put it like that
(Barry laughs) as long as we can have two ramekins worth. – No we don’t need two ramekins worth! – It’s quite wet. Oh it’s not quite wet, Barry. Barry it’s cooking, it’s fine. It could nearly be ready. – Well why’d you put it back in again? – ‘Cause I panicked. – [Barry] Take it out, just fluff it up, see how nice and fluffy it is. – I’ll tell you what that needs. It needs some (slaps) tomato put through it. – [Barry] You reckoned? – [Jamie] That is actually good rice. Right, so cream into the chicken. – Good swirling. – [Mark] Oh so chefly. – Guys you’ve got two minutes. – [Barry] Can I do the rice now? – [Jamie] Yes. – [James] I would’ve promised
that chicken parsley. Love a bit of parsley. – [Mark] Is that rice gonna hold? – You have one minute.
– One minute. – [Jamie] It’s one minute, Barry. – [Barry] I know! I’m waiting for you! – Where am I going? – So rest chicken on the side. – [Mark] Oh, is it gonna fall over? – Yep nice.
(Mark groans) – [Jamie] It’s too heavy. It was too heavy, that’s what happened. – No.
– How long they got? – [James] Thirty seconds
– [Barry] Oh Jamie, Jamie, what are you doing? Jamie, what are you doing? Jamie, what are you doing? What are you doing? What are you (bleep) – Where’s the tomatoes? Where’s the tomatoes? – [Mark] You’ve got twenty
seconds to finish it! – Tomatoes. Get some herbs! – Herbs. What herbs?!
– Get some parsley. – There are no herbs!
– [James] They’re plastic. – These are all fake! Where are the herbs?! – In the red. – Nine, eight, seven, six, five, four,
– Parsley! – three, two, one! – Stop cooking! Did he just throw you
some spinach leaves?! – [Barry] Yeah.
(laughter) – I’m knackered. That looked tough. To be honest, the fact
that there is something that looks edible and actually quite tasty on a plate, I think fair play, that’s amazing. – [James] Good job. – We used amazing ingredients. – I can’t even start by
saying I think it looks good. (laughter) – I think you did a great job. – [Barry] It looks like
it a mid-week meal. – It does.
– Not French cooking. – It looks like it fell onto the plate. I felt like it was going quite
well up until the plating. – I feel like you peaked at
some point during the middle, and then it was a horrendous
decline for the rest of the time.
– I think not having a visual reference to anything, or just an extra sentence to describe it is really tough. ‘Cause I couldn’t picture
what we were plating until, well it just fell onto the plate. (laughter) (light music) – It tastes so French. And good. It’s good. I think the chicken might be a touch over, but the sauce…
– Wow. Oh wow, the sauce is delicious. – [James] Yeah, I want more sauce. – This rice is definitely average. – Yeah I think that was rushed. – Alright mate. – Ah! Judgment time.
– Judgment time. Who performed best? – I thought it was a clear choice ’cause Jay really took charge. And then the rice happened. (laughter) – I took charge of the rice. That was the problem. – I think it’s still gonna be Jay as the head chef. – No, I’ll take that. – He took it on from the start. You’re sous chef. – Jay had the vision. – He did. He got stuck in. It’s a nice recipe though, right? – It’s a lovelty recipe. – I love the challenge it brings. – I loved cooking from that when I did it. Relly enjoyed it. – Boom! Right, well James is desperate to
cook from this book again, Ben’s not here and he has no choice so he will also be joining him to cook so comment down below a page number between 45
and two hundred and… – 39. – And then choose a
number between 1 and 20, which denotes the lines down
on the page for the recipe and we’ll give it to these guys and see how they get on with it. – This is silly. This is not how this was meant to end. (laughter) – The question is, “James
chose his head chef, “whose would yours be?” Comment down below. – So hey, that was us
reviewing a cookbook. D’you know who else makes cookbooks? – I do. – We make cookbooks. Oh, I hate myself. – Gentle segue, but it
is worth checking out. Join the club down below, and you get access to the Sorted books app which gices you access to
all the cookbooks we’ve done in the last couple of years. That’s six and counting. And each one is a
completely different theme. And yet they’re all awesome. – You can also get your physical hands on physical copies of the books. All the information to get them is in the link downstairs. – Otherwise we will see
you every Wednesday, every Sunday, back in this fridge for more of this. – See you soon. – Or similar. – [Announcer] As we mentioned, we don’t just make top-quality YouTube videos. We’ve built the Sorted club, where we use the best things we’ve learnt to create stuff that’s
hopefully interesting and useful to other food lovers. Check it out if you’re interested. Thank you for watching, and we’ll see you in a few days. – Could I just make a quick comparison? – Yeah. – What’s the big difference between our books and that book? – This one has sold in its thousands. (Barry and Mark laugh) (Jamie laughs) – Murder him.

100 thoughts on “Home cooks try to use a cookbook from 1914!!

  1. You should do a pass it on where the first person randomly chooses a recipe from the book or from a hat and starts cooking it and then the next people all choose a different random recipe and have to adapt whats been made already to fit the new recipe

  2. What a beautiful disaster. Glorious train wreck. If it wasn't the Sorted crew I'd be impressed that something edible came out of all this. But – it's the Sorted crew so of course they somehow pulled it off. I suspect sorcery.

  3. When James and Mike were talking on the side I had a hard time hearing them. I had to turn on closed captioning. James can have a very soft voice, so putting some closed captioning on the video itself would be very helpful so I don't have to turn on cc just because of James and Mike.

  4. The only thing this video is missing is the different interpretations of the recipe. Wish we had seen Ben's or the same lecturer's interpretation (from the previous french cuisine video) of the dish at the end. Because even with google I was still confused what the end goal was supposed to be. More of this though because I need to watch Barry panic some more.

  5. 50 – 13
    Also please show some examples as well so we can get an idea of what the recipe can be interpreted as. That was the best part last time.

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